Faith Like a Mustard Seed (4 of 4)

While I have reflected on faith and its comparison to various things in nature over the past few days, I turn today to a few of Jesus’ parables about nature. Jesus describes both the kingdom of God and faith as a mustard seed.

Mark 4:30-32, TNIV – “Again he said, “What shall we say the kingdom of God is like, or what parable shall we use to describe it? It is like a mustard seed, which is the smallest of all seeds on earth. Yet when planted, it grows and becomes the largest of all garden plants, with such big branches that the birds can perch in its shade.”

Luke 17:5-6, TNIV – “The apostles said to the Lord, “Increase our faith!” [Jesus] replied, “If you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,’ and it will obey you.”

While there are many ways of considering faith, I hope that these reflections have been helpful for you in considering your own faith. I have enjoyed writing them.

What else would you have included in this series?

Faith Like a Rock (3 of 4)

As the winter has turned to spring in Kansas, I have been reflecting on faith and its comparison to various things in nature. This is the third in a series of posts on this topic.

A rock, especially a large one, is solid and doesn’t change very often. This type of faith would be unchanging across a long period of time. Circumstances might change the exterior (like snow or rain on a rock’s surface) but the interior faith would remain the same. While a tree goes through the seasons in a year, this type of faith could cycle much more often or perhaps over a series of years. Unlike the deciduous tree or evergreen tree there would not really be periods of growth and dormancy. No disease, no pests and not much change.

Would you like to have faith like a rock?

What else would you add to this simile?

Faith Like an Evergreen Tree (1 of 4)

As the winter has turned to spring in Kansas, I have been reflecting on faith and its comparison to various things in nature. This is the first in a series of posts on this topic.

An evergreen tree is always green no matter what the season. This type of faith would be constant regardless of the circumstances in which one found oneself. There would be periods of growth and dormancy, but they would not be noticeable on the outside. Any disease or pests become evident when the leaves begin to turn brown. Questions about faith or times of spiritual discontent would be evident on the outside only after they had made an impact internally.

Would you like to have faith like an evergreen tree?

What else would you add to this simile?

The Echo Within

I just finished up The Echo Within: Finding Your True Calling by Robert Benson. I admit that I was a bit skeptical of the book when I started. From the front and back cover, I assumed that it would be a bit too lovely for me. I was surprised at what I found.

Benson writes with a cadence that flows between personal narrative, interactions with others and teaching about listening for God’s call in your life. The book is titled after the resonance that forms when one hears or experiences something which may be a true calling – something for which God has created a particular individual.

I recommend it for someone that is looking for a narrative look at how to listen for God’s voice in your life. While I am not as comfortable with Benson’s approach to faith as others that are more direct, I found value in this book. I have someone in mind whom I believe may find it valuable and will pass it along.

If you are interested, you can purchase it at
The Echo Within: Finding Your True Calling.

The Becoming of G-d

The Becoming of G-d by Ian Mobsby is a wandering look at the nature of God as Trinity, ecclesiology, spirituality and the interactions thereof. The Becoming of G-d is Mobsby’s second book and was published in May 2008. From Mobsby’s website:

Ian Mobsby is one of the founding members of the Moot Community with past involvement in two previous alt worship/emerging church communities. Ian is an ordained Anglican priest working with Moot full time in the Diocese of London, an associate Missioner of the Church of England Archbishop’s Fresh Expressions Team, and an associate lecturer of the St Paul’s Theological Centre in London.

Mobsby touches on a wide variety of topics in The Becoming of G-d. I found his treatment of perichoresis (interpenetration) and kenosis (pouring out) in regard to the Trinity to be particularly interesting. Mobsby ranges from Rublev’s Trinity, models of the church, and the becoming of community, belonging, forgiveness, hope and justice. Mobsby is aware of and addresses common critiques of the models that he proposes.

Mobsby touches on a wide variety of topics but manages to keep them connected and related to the Trinity. The writing is a bit rough and in need of editing in places, but this manages to lend authenticity and rawness. I recommend this book for those interested or exploring newer ways of being church and are ready for a scavenger hunt of connections to the Trinity, both inside and outside the church.

Speedlinking – March 18, 2008