The Power of “Good Job”

One of the jewels of the Shawnee County Parks and Recreation system is the Lake Shawnee Trail. Nearly every time I go for a run, I use it in some way. At times, a short loop around Tinman Circle and others around the entire lake with an extension down Berryton Road to reach my target mileage.

Encountering others on the trail is common. Whether it is walkers, bikers, runners, couples, children, or animals, the path is utilized by a wide variety of people. I will make a point to say “Hello” or “Good morning” to people I encounter. It’s about 50-50 on whether I get a response. Some people reply with a similar greeting and others are lost in thought, their headphones, or even a book. Last week, someone greeted me in a way that was new to me.

A smile, thumbs up, and “Good Job!”

Wait, what? This was unexpected. I am glad to get a response, much less cheering on my efforts. There was no way this person could have known my training plan, energy expended, or even how far I was going that particular day. Despite all of these things, the choice of greeting was an encouragement.

Whether it is a colleague with whom you work closely on shared goals, a family member or a random stranger on the path, there is a superpower in offering encouragement to others. Thanks to this encounter, I will be making an effort to provide support to others.

Will you join me?

Speedlinking – July 2, 2010

Speedlinking – March 23, 2009

Healing in the Name of Jesus

Why couldn’t / didn’t Peter heal in the name of the Holy Spirit? Acts 1:8 – Christ promises “power when the Holy Spirit comes upon [them]” Acts 3:6 – Peter heals in the name of Jesus.

I tried to find a reference about Jesus giving direction or instruction about healing in his name. The only reference that I could find was in Mark:

“Teacher,” said John, “we saw someone driving out demons in your name and we told him to stop, because he was not one of us.”
“Do not stop him,” Jesus said. “No one who does a miracle in my name can in the next moment say anything bad about me, for whoever is not against us is for us. Truly I tell you, anyone who gives you a cup of water in my name because you belong to the Messiah will certainly be rewarded. Mark 9:38-41, TNIV

In John 10:25, Jesus refers to his healing “in my Father’s name.” But I could not find a reference of any one healing in the name of the Holy Spirit. (By the way, when I say that I could not find it – I most often use the keyword search at http://www.tniv.info/bible/index.php which I have found to be quite usable and useful.)

My sense is that the power of healing is rooted in the power of the resurrection – Jesus’ conquering of death. In Acts 1:8 Jesus says that they will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on them, not necessarily that the power is of the Holy Spirit.

This the best response that I can formulate at this time, but I am a bit unsatisfied with it. What would you add?

This question came out of a young adult small group taster last Sunday morning in which I taught about the question “What is the Trinity?”

Activity of the Son

I see the Father and the Holy Spirit as still active but just see the Son as by God’s side. Can you explain how the three are still active today? Is the son’s role over after his death and resurrection?

I believe that God is very active in the world in many different ways and most importantly in bringing God’s kingdom into reality. As to the activity of each of the three persons of the Trinity see Immanent and Economic Trinity.

The Son’s role is not over after death and resurrection. I asked my wife, Nicole, about this and she reminded me that anywhere we see resurrection the power of Jesus Christ is at work in the world. At the death of a loved one, the power of Christ is active in bringing hope that this life is not all there is. When a middle age person decides that her or his life is headed in the wrong direction and makes drastic changes toward living as a disciple, Christ is drawing the person into relationship.

I think that the Son’s activity today may also be thought about in Jesus’ final words in the gospel according to Matthew:

Then the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had told them to go. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. 18 Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” Matthew 28:16-20, TNIV

All authority on heaven and on earth have been given to the Son and this is why we are sent to make disciples, baptize and teach. Not only that, but Jesus promises presence with us until the end of time.

This question came out of a young adult small group taster last Sunday morning in which I taught about the question “What is the Trinity?”