Is Christianity the only missionary religion?

I have had the opportunity to lead the Builders Sunday Morning Small Group for three weeks studying the gospel according to Mark. This question was from the final class meeting.

Is Christianity the only missionary religion? The answer is no.

From the Wikipedia entry for missionary – “A missionary is a member of a religion who works to convert those who do not share the missionary’s faith; someone who proselytizes.”

From this entry and others, I was able to find a few a little more information on particular religions.

Religions that have missionary efforts

  • Buddhism
  • Christianity
  • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
  • Islam
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses

Religions that do not have missionary efforts

  • Hinduism
  • Judaism

This is certainly not a comprehensive list of religions, but perhaps gives an idea about the division. Some religions are more comfortable with pluralism, which has a direct impact on whether they carry out missionary efforts. This was an interesting question for me to research as I had not really thought about this question before. Thanks for the question!

Citation – Wikipedia contributors, “Missionary,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Missionary&oldid=209656492 (accessed May 5, 2008).

Christianity and Other Religions

I had a great breakfast at First Watch with Scott on Tuesday morning. He wanted to talk about an experience in which he felt that a church leader depreciated Christianity in relationship to other religions of the world. The relationship between Christianity and other religions is a topic that I find to be quite complex. Here is some of my response.

Christianity and world religions
Judaism has a distinct relationship with Christianity among all other world religions. The God to whom Jesus prays and speaks to as Father is the God of the Hebrew scriptures. God remains faithful to the covenant that was made with the people of Israel. Paul wrestles with this relationship in several chapters in the book of Romans.

Will persons of other faith traditions be saved? I am not sure. I do believe that Jesus is the way, the truth and the life. I believe that the Christian hope is that all things will be made new in the second coming of Christ. I do not think that anything will remain that is old. I believe that Christ’s incarnation, life, death and resurrection is a part of God’s work for all of creation. What exactly this means for persons of other religions, I do not know.

As a pastor, it is part of my responsibility to be concerned with how it is with others’ souls. I believe that this is the responsibility of all Christians – to watch over one another in love (as Wesley would say). However, I believe that it is more important to first be concerned with the state of my own soul and my journey of discipleship. I believe that one should be more concerned for the state of one’s own soul than with making judgments on the state of others.

Thoughts about conversations with those of other religions

  • Do not ever belittle your own religion when confronted with another religion. There is no need to be bashful or reticent about your beliefs. However, at the same time be careful not to belittle another’s religion.
  • Focus on invitational conversations. In interfaith conversations there needs to be a readiness to both give and receive.
  • I believe that it is more important for Christians to focus on sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ with non and nominally religious persons than with those who already have a faith.

I recognize that this is a broad topic and that this response does not even come close to touching all areas that would be needed. What would you add to this conversation? How do you understand the relationship between Christianity and other religions? What thoughts do you have about interfaith conversations?