Perspective on Capacity from Ray Pitman (3 of 3)

Rockhurst University
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I have had the privilege of spending time with Ray Pitman, a member of Resurrection, over the past several months. Several years ago, I officiated at the funeral for his wife, Betty, and we reconnected this summer when I lead worship at Leawood one Saturday night. I found his perspective on capacity to be particularly helpful as presented to an executive MBA class at the Helzberg School of Management at Rockhurst University.

As drinking glasses exist in different sizes, people have varying capacities in life and work. If you fill a glass to the point of overflowing it won’t do any good to keep putting water in it. When your own glass is overflowing you have to be able to recognize that and make sure that you are surrounded by other people who have some additional capacity.

Four Keys to Business and Entrepreneurship from Ray Pitman (2 of 3)

I have had the privilege of spending time with Ray Pitman, a member of Resurrection, over the past several months. Several years ago, I officiated at the funeral for his wife, Betty, and we reconnected this summer when I lead worship at Leawood one Saturday night. He has shared with me over and over his four keys to business and entrepreneurship. I have found them to be applicable in a wide variety of circumstances:

  1. Opportunity – Be able to recognize an opportunity when it presents itself.
  2. Vision – Have the vision to project that opportunity to where it might go; Be able to recognize if this is the opportunity for you
  3. Ability – Have the ability to make it happen
  4. Passion – Have passion for what you are doing.

Wisdom for Life from Ray Pitman (1 of 3)

Seal of Rockhurst University
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I have had the privilege of spending time with Ray Pitman, a member of Resurrection, over the past several months. Several years ago, I officiated at the funeral for his wife, Betty, and we reconnected this summer when I lead worship at Leawood one Saturday night. Last Friday he invited me to hear him speak to an executive MBA class at the Helzberg School of Management at Rockhurst University. He has told his life as a case study to classes at the Helzberg School for several years and I wanted to share a few tidbits for life, work and ministry.

  • Don’t ever be afraid to ask. Don’t worry if you don’t have the money to accomplish a project that you have in mind. If the idea is great, there will be someone that will be able to help fund it.
  • Just because your back is against the wall don’t think that there isn’t anything to do about it.
  • What may seem to be tragedy at the time may be the best thing that ever happened to you.
  • Surround yourself with people that are smarter than you are and your horizons will be broadened by their abilities.
  • Sometimes its best to ignore the details and focus on the people who are caring for the details.

Iterate Fast and Release Often

This is one of the principles which has guided me in the development of Resurrection Online and the guidance for micro churches supported by the simulcast of worship. This principle is well outlined at this post – The “Iterate Fast and Release Often” Philosophy of Entrepreneurship, from which I take this quote:

The core tenet of this philosophy is that it’s more important to launch a product and new features and iterate rather than take the extra time necessary to “perfect” a product or feature before launch.

We have already experienced this at Resurrection Online as a significant number of people from our current congregation who are sick or out of town are currently worshiping with us online. We would not have anticipated that this population was there without launching while knowing that there were significant technical improvements and adjustments that would need to be made.

The website for Resurrection Online (http://live.cor.org) is still far from where I hope that it will be, but it is out there and people are finding meaningful connection. I hope we are able to release features as soon as reasonable and make changes based on feedback from congregants who are worshiping online.