Tag Archives: supervision

@HarvardBiz and the UMC: The Right Mindset for Success

Mindset (book)
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One of my favorite podcasts is the HBR IdeaCast. Episode 283, The Right Mindset for Success, focuses on the distinctions between a fixed and growth mindset. One of the most helpful portions was about supervision and management. This list, from Carol Dweck, describes the methods and message that a manager or leader could give to new employees that would put them into a growth mindset:

  • We value passion, dedication, growth and learning; not genius.
  • We do not expect that you have arrived here fully formed. We expect that you have arrived here ready to learn.
  • We expect you to stretch beyond your comfort zone and take reasonable risks. We do not expect you to do the same thing you are good at over and over and stay in your comfort zone.
  • We value and reward process, taking on big but reasonable challenges, dogged pursuit of challenges and teamwork.
  • Even without success we reward that you have engaged in the process in a wholehearted and smart way.

I have much to learn from these methods in the way that I supervise staff and volunteers. These methods would be helpful for:

  • Pastors with staff and volunteers
  • Board of Ordained Ministry with candidates
  • Bishops and District Superintendents with appointed clergy.

Myths of Annual Conference: Supervision

I am in my third year of ministry as an appointed United Methodist pastor. An important part of my life is that I am a member of the annual conference. The annual conference is a community of those who have been called to a life in ministry within the United Methodist Church in a particular geographic area. It is also an annual business meeting to order our life together.

I have encountered several feelings about life in the annual conference that I believe are myths. One of these myths is that as a clergy person I should be reluctant to share my personal life with colleagues because that person may some day be my supervisor as a District Superintendent one day.

This is complete garbage.

I believe that it is crucial to share my life with colleagues in ministry because the community of the annual conference is one of the most important, perhaps the most important, community of which I am a part as a United Methodist pastor. I do not care if someone may some day be my supervisor. I think that it is even more important for a supervisor to know who I am as a person. Avoiding relationship because of a potential supervisory role in the future is a myth of the annual conference.