Tag Archives: spiritual discipline

A Call to Spiritual Formation

I go through seasons in my practice of spiritual disciplines and now is a time for a refresh.

I found inspiration and encouragement in A Call to Spiritual Formation – a simple document addressing the need for continual spiritual formation of every Christian. I invite you to visit the website at http://acalltospiritualformation.info and sign your name to the document if it resonates with your life.

The next step for me is to dig in to a renewed practice of spiritual disciplines. I am still looking for what might be next…

What spiritual disciplines have you found to be formational in your life and would recommend?

Mowing as Spiritual Discipline

I mowed the grass last night and it felt great. I was tired by the end, but it was well worth it. Not only were the grass blades, which had been knitting themselves together in a bit of a jungle, trimmed down to a reasonable level but my soul was watered by the experience.

  • When I mow the lawn, my brain has to stay engaged in what I am doing, but not so much that it can’t wander if necessary.
  • I bring some level of order out of some level of chaos.
  • When I am done, I can see the results.
  • There are no shortcuts – I have to push that mower across every bit of lawn.
  • The physical exercise is good.

Ahh, mowing the lawn…

Me, Myself and I AM

Me, Myself, and I AM: A Unique Question and Answer Book: The Story of You and God by Matthew Peters is a book unlike any other that I have experienced before. Through a series of questions on many topics the author guides the reader through a discernment process. It is designed to be used in any order, at one time, or across a period of time.

I was at first skeptical of the book, but took some time to work through a few sections myself. I was pleasantly surprised. The questions are thoughtful, probing and at times a bit off beat. I found it to be an effective way to move through a time of self-reflection and discernment. I found some similarities with Wesley’s questions contained in the Rules of the Band Groups, but not close to the depth.

This book is only as good as the effort that the reader puts into engaging with the questions. Without a serious attempt to venture into self-reflection it is a worthless addition to your shelf. However an earnest effort at introspection will yield fruit. I am looking forward to continuing to engage with this book in the months to come.